Thursday, September 20, 2018

Frank A. Tichenor 1880-1950: 
Early Aviation Publicist and Motion Picture Production Pioneer
Editor of Aero Digest, The World`s Greatest Aeronautical Magazine

Frank Aloysius Tichenor was born 22 May 1880 to George W. and Elizabeth Tichenor in Gethsemanie Kentucky. He was a graduate of Villanova College.
The 1905 Burlington New Jersey census listed Frank Tichenor as 25 years old, a photographer living with his parents.
Around this time he came to New York and joined the Motion Picture Industry. He was the president of General Film in its hey day and fought through the bitter patents war which resulted in independants breaking General`s monopoly. 
Tichenor formed Eastern Film Corporation from what was left of General Film. From 1919 to 1929 Eastern produced educational and industrial films. Tichenor is credited with producing the first cancer awareness educational film, "The Reward of Courage" in 1921, for the American Society for the Control of Cancer.
He married Lillian Stott 27 Jan 1913. Her Father Alex Stott was born in Scotland and her Mother was Frida Stott born in Sweden. There was one child born, Frank A. Tichenor Jr. July 8, 1913.
Frank & Frank Jr. , From the Frank Tichenor scrapbook
Frank A. Tichenor Jr. while attending St. Thomas` Academy NY
12 July 1913 there was a Motion-Pictures Exhibitors League of America Convention and International Motion-Pictures Exhibition in the Grand Central Palace. There was some trouble there lead by Samuel S. Trigger President of the New York State branch and there was a split in the league. With Frank A. Tichenor, Samuel Trigger left the convention. Thomas A. Edison and his wife attended the International Motion-Pictures Exhibition. Edison told a reporter in reference to the future of the moving picture: "Perfect opera, all delusions will be perfect and probably the actual color will be produced." When asked will this be your work? "Unless someone gets ahead of me" When asked will the talking pictures displace the silent drama? "No, both the speaking and silent moving pictures will continue to exist. Both will be improved. Both as they stand are just samples. Now we will go on to perfection. Both have been shown just to exhibit the possibilities."

The 1915 New York census lists Frank Tichenor Sr. as a manufacturer of motion pictures.
Letter with cartoon to his son on Jaxon Film Corp. Envelope

Letter with cartoon  to his son on Eastern Motion Picture Co. envelope

Tichenor was credited with arranging for Will H. Hays, Postmaster General on President Harding`s cabinet to leave and become "Czar of an industry plagued by morals scandals" with a $100,000 a year salary offered by Samuel Goldwyn.

1922 finds Tichenor interested in aviation. He organized the Aeronautical Digest Publishing Company which published Aero Digest, the most respected technical magazine in its field. Other aviation publications include the Revista Aerea, Spanish edition of the Digest circulated in Latin America, The Sportsman Pilot and the Weekly Letter to Airmen. He also published Plumbing and Heating Journal and The Spur.
He was friends with the early fliers Billy Mitchell, Gen. Henry "Hap"Arnold, Gen. Ben Foulois, Admiral John Henry Towers, Charles Lindberg and referred to them as "my boys". He was friends with Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Harding & Coolidge. He was a supporter and friend of Fiorello La Guardia.
Sept. 14,  1925 Frank A. Tichenor left, President Coolidge & Eddie Rickenbacker center

July 1925 Tichenor was on committee for the National Air Race at Mitchell Field Long Island Oct. 8, 9 & 10 with Pulitzer Trophy as the prize during the National Aeronautic Association Convention.
Frank A. Tichenor`s Aero Digest Special Daily Bulletin for New York 1925 Air Races


Letter with cartoon to his son on Aero Digest envelope
There were two 1926 Richard E. Byrd medals presented by Rodman Wanamaker at a Luncheon in the Wanamaker store in New York on July 9, 1926 in the Frank A. Tichenor scrapbook. Here is a photo of the last one I have for sale. Rodman Wanamaker was a a supporter of early aviation and had the plane America in the store. He also helped fund one of Byrd`s later flights.
Byrd Arctic Expedition Medal 1926
There were some amazing items in the Frank A. Tichenor scrapbook that have sold over the last few years. Below is a good example. It is a postmarked Aero Corp. of California envelope addressed to Frank Tichenor`s future wife, Miss J. E. Horsfall signed by pilot Jack Frye and was carried on the first Air Express delivery from Los Angeles to Tucson Nov. 28, 1927.
Jack Frye, founder of Aero Corp., which became Standard Airlines in 1927 and Standard consolidated with Western Air Express to form Transcontinental and Western Air (TWA). Jack Frye was the first President of TWA.
Signed by Jack Frye first President of TWA
Frank A. Tichenor and Jessie Horsfall drove Charles Lindberg to Curtiss Field a bit before 3 am May 20, 1927 and came upon a crowd of more than five hundred onlookers. The Spirit of St. Louis would be hauled to Roosevelt Field where Lindberg would take off at about 8 am with five sandwiches for the flight to Paris.

In 1927 Tichenor`s wife Lillian hired a private investigator to trail Tichenor and get evidence of his cheating so she could file for divorce.
In 1929, Tichenor married Jessie E. Horsfall in Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Jessie Evelyn Horsfall was a 1915 graduate of Randolph Macon Women`s College in Lynchburg Virginia. By 1927, she was an editor at Aero Digest. 
Jessie E. Horsfall 1913, later, editor of Aero Digest

There was a newspaper article in 1937 which stated that Lillian Tichenor was having an affair with the private investigator she had hired 10 years before and had moved several times to be close to Gerard Luisi. Luisis` wife sued for seperation. Lillian married Gerard Luisi.
July 1939, The Early Birds Eastern Division, aviators who flew before 1916, presented Frank Tichenor a scroll in recognition of his services to aviation and commemorated Peter Carne`s first balloon ascent 150 years ago in Baltimore. Tichenor said he would soon present a collection of 300 items on aviation to the Early Birds Museum at Dearborn Michigan.

The 1941 Associated Press name card index to AP stories lists him as Chairman of Advisory Committee to Federal Civil Aeronautics Authority, criticizes defense factory workers who demand higher wages.
June 1947 Tichenor received the W. J. McGough memorial Award from Air Services Post 501, American Legion for his contributions nto the development of aviation.

May 4, 1950 Frank A. Tichenor dies unexpectedly in his home in Greenwich Connecticut.
Sept. 1950 Aero Digest was sold to Lincoln Press Inc. of Washington.
After Frank Tichenor died at their home in Connecticut, Jessie Horsfall Tichenor moved to Exmore Virginia on the Eastern Shore of VA. She traveled abroad and lived to be 93. She died in 1988 and is buried in St. Georges Episcopal Church Cemetery in Pungoteague Virginia. The Frank A. Tichenor scrapbook was found in her home and sold in an estate sale along with a wealth of historical items from the Tichenor collection.
This man lived in an exciting time and seized every opportunity to do what he loved. He contributed so much to film and aviation and he should be remembered.
I hope that this blog will raise awareness for forgotten history, for those people who were pioneers in the technology that made this country great. Don`t give up on your dreams. Read more, learn more, aspire to be great.
Here is a link to some of the Frank A. Tichenor scrapbook items I have for sale in my ebay store. It is my hope that an aviation museum or a donor would be interested in purchasing the remaining items from the Tichenor scrapbook and putting them on display in a museum.
Reference sources for this blog are from my own research, the New York Times and Ancestry.com

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Historical West Point VA Bottle

                                     HISTORICAL WEST POINT VIRGINIA BOTTLE

 While treasure hunting Saturday, I came across this curious 3 sided bottle embossed with Edwards` Banner Brand West Point Va. I purchased it without doing any research. The first thing I did was consult a friend who is a bottle expert to confirm the age and type of bottle.
So knowing it was from 1900-1910 and a pickle bottle, I set out to research the company.







   I found absolutely nothing in any West Point Virginia history or West Point Historical Society site about Edwards Pickles. There was a huge fire there in 1903 that destroyed about 52 businesses. The only mention of a pickle factory was the later business by the name of Tidewater Pickle Company, but I knew it came about in the 1920`s and was not old enough.
   Finally, Monday morning, I found an article in the Baltimore Sun dated Sept. 19, 1900 titled "West Point Va, A Live Town Situated at The Headwaters of The York River". The article was clearly promoting West Point as a prime location for business, residence and for recreation. It was a time when many businesses were opening and established businesses were opening branches there. There was the reference to the pickle company I was looking for, "while the B. W. Edwards Pickling Company opened this season and have already handled and brined over 2,000,000 cucumbers, and the season Is not yet over" 
   Now we know that the B. W. Edwards Pickling Company opened in 1900 in West Point. This is a rare lost piece of West Point Va history.

Transcript of the Sept. 19, 1900 Baltimore Sun article:


West Point, Va.
 A Live Town Situated at Headwaters of York River
But Few Vacant Houses
Important Enterprises in Operation and Other to Be Projected-Cornstalks To Be Used
Special Dispatch to The Baltimore Sun

West Point, Va., Sept. 17. This live town Is located in King William County, Va., Just at the headwaters of the York river,' about 40 miles from the bay. The town being immediately on salt water, with the finest drinking water from the celebrated artesian wells, is very healthy. These wells can be had by any citizen for the sum of $35, furnishing the best and purest drinking water. The town has about 2,000 Inhabitants and is constantly growing. Scarcely a vacant house can be found in town at this time. There are several Important factories In operation and building, while others are contemplating locating here on account of the many natural advantages, such as line climate, cheap labor, deep water frontage, fine rail and water facilities, good drinking water and free sites and other good natural advantages. The oyster industry is very large and is constantly growing. There are already five large packers and shippers here the Stansbury Packing Company, the A. F. Smither Company. Dr.  Geo. W. Richardson, Capt.  J. Willie Marshall and Capt. J. L. Mulford. These gentlemen work a large force and buy a quantity of oysters, besides what they grow themselves. The York River Oyster is taking a stand with the best and most celebrated of the country, and are shipped in large quantities South, West, East and North. The Stansbury Company also handles in season a large quantity of fresh fish, peas, peaches, berries and tomatoes. Their celebrated York River brands of packed  goods has taken a stand at the top of tho market. The Ammonds Pickling Company, of Richmond, Va., opened a brining house here last season, where they handled many cucumbers. This season they are handling many more, while the B. W. Edwards Pickling Company opened this season and have already handled and brined over 2,000,000 cucumbers, and the season Is not yet over.
To Utilize Cornstalks 
The Marsden Company, of Philadelphia, have located one of their factories at this place and are spending about $150,000 in buildings and machinery. They will begin operations about December 1, 1000, when they will buy all of the waste cornstalks, usually thrown away or burned by the farmer to get off his land. This company will manufacture many and various articles from the inner portion of the stalk, making a very fine feed of the outer portion. They will buy every cornstalk grown within five miles of our three rivers, giving the farmers a good price for an article they are glad to have removed from their lands. The Wheeler & Denmead Bros.' shipyard and marine railway Is located here, where any vessel can be repaired, from the scraping and repainting of Its bottom, to finishing the highest mast for the same. There are many stores of each kind here, and any goods wanted clothing, furniture, groceries, hardware, machinery, vehicles and farm Implements can be had as cheap as In the large cities. There is yet room for many other  factories, such as furniture, shoes, glass, spokes, hubs, buggies, wagons, brooms, etc. The town and people will give free sites, free of taxation, etc.
A Good Farming Section 
The surrounding country is a good farming section. King William County is noted for its fine wheat, grass, cattle, truck, fruit and vegetable lands. The farmlands are yet cheap and can be bought on reasonable terms. The town and country is reached daily by fine steamers from Baltimore, Md., Norfolk. Va., and three trains a day from Richmond, Va. There is no denying the fact that this region is an excellent one for sportsmen. The fields and marshes are every season alive with the cries of plover, graybacks, golden-plover, snipe, yellow-shanks, willet and doe birds, all fat and Juicy from feeding upon the richest food, obtained both from land and water. Later the succulent butterballs fall in hundreds beneath the aim of the marksmen. When cold weather has set in red-head, mallard and black ducks, springtails, blackheads, and gray-winged and blue-winged teal trail heron from the North In countless myriads and make the waters of the York, the Pamunkey and the Mattaponi their feeding-grounds for many weeks.
 Ideal  place for Fishermen 
For the fisherman who comes hither the greatest delights are in store. In the waters of the three rivers, which meet in front of the Terminal Hotel, are  never  failing schools of the rarest and gamest  fish the snapper, with scales of burnished red; sheepshead, crafty and vicious in content with angler; Jumping mullets, shaped like trout, but with broader heads; low-finned trout, whose habitat is salt water- shad, rivaling in flavor and firmness of flesh their far-famed migratory fellows of the Delaware; pompano, excelling  in sweetness their brethren of Mobile bay; spots, second only in the list of panfish and deriving their name from a brilliant disk behind their gills: chicken-halibut, placed in these waters some 15 years ago by the United States Fish Commissioner, and more popular than all, the rock and the croaker. The business men of the town have recently organized a business men's association and are making efforts to get other Industries located in the town by offering special Inducements. Mr. Ned Bland is president and E. Wilkinson, Jr., secretary. The schools of the town are good, a good -graded free school, with three teachers, while Prof. J. T. Walker.  A. B., has a very fine academy for boys and young men, who are prepared for business or college. Mrs. W. R. Broadus has made a line reputation for her seminary for young ladies and girls, who are given the usual English branches, with the languages and music.

B. W. Edwards in the 1900 Federal Census for the town of West Point Va listed as a merchant with a wife and eight children. Third man listed on line 6. In the 1880 Census, he was still living in Rivanna, Albemarle County Va. and listed as a Carpenter.



While Brice William Edwards was engaged in the lumber business as early as 1897 in Baltimore, It seems  he was instrumental in the building up of West Point Virginia from about 1900-1903. He was also involved in local politics.  I found several articles in the Richmond Dispatch. Jan. 26, 1898, Arrivals Baltimore 25 Jan. 1898, Schooner Charles Linthicum, Colsten from Bermuda Hundred, lumber to Edwards & Asendorf. (Asendorff was his partner for a while). Feb. 12, 1901 Mr. Edwards authorized B.W. Hefferson and J. L. Munford to erect a wharf, dock or pier on their lots situated in the Town of West Point. 7 May 1901, Arrival, Baltimore, 6 May, Schooner Maggie, Simmons, from Sander`s Va., Lumber to Edwards & Asendorf. May 11, 1901, Mr. Simon Lichty,  and listed as German Yiddish and a merchant living in West Point in 1900, removed his family to Portsmouth, where in partnership with Mr. B.W. Edwards, he is successfully engaged in business. Lichty is listed as a Jeweler in 1910 with his own store in Portsmouth. April 18, 1902, Edwards was running for Mayor against A. W. Eastwood. May 24, 1902 he lost the election to A.W. Eastwood. January 24, 1903 he suspends publication of "The State Republican" which he has been publishing for the last six moths. The town is in darkness because the electric plant is in want of fuel. 
He must have moved to Baltimore after the 1903 fire in West Point and concentrated on his lumber business. His sons joined him in the lumber business and his business at death was listed as B.W. Edwards & Sons. He died of a heart attack Sept. 6, 1908. He was originally from Albemarle County Virginia. 

7 Sept. 1908 Baltimore Sun




Also included his daughter`s U.S. Passport Application with photo of her and younger brother.

The Edwards` Banner Brand West Point Va bottle sold to a West Point Va collector.
 

Monday, November 7, 2016


A Series of two Folk Art Paintings by the 
Late, Virginia, Visionary Folk Artist 
Michael Lee Cook 
Presented by Sunday Historical

These two animal and flower themed paintings, Skippy and Her Kits and Backyard Rabbits are for sale now on Sunday Historical`s web store sundayhistorical.com or can be purchased locally. Both are acrylic, 16 x 20, framed and signed by the artist.

In November 2016, fourteen of Michael Cook`s  Halloween series paintings sold to one buyer who felt a deep connection with the paintings.

MICHAEL LEE COOK  1956-2014
Ruther Glen Virginia
Gallery Association: America Oh Yes at Hilton Head Island, SC and Washington, DC
Work shown at other Venues: The Inn at Glen Echo, Glen Echo, Maryland; Washington Design Center, Art on Six, Washington, DC; Folkfest, Atlanta, Georgia
The Bio below was used on the America Oh Yes Gallery website in the late 1990`s, where he had his first shows and enjoyed success as a Visionary Folk Artist.          

“Michael Cook's interest in art began more than twenty five years ago during high school. He has no formal training and previous efforts in art were restricted to pencil sketching. A few years after high school Michael's creative endeavors fell by the wayside and receded into the past, for the most part forgotten. During the intervening years he worked in a environmental/technical engineering field, including a stint as a facility manager for a public utility. In August of 1998 Michael was involved in a motorcycle accident. This became a crux for reflection and change. He walked out of a fourteen year career and started his own business. Finding some success but little satisfaction, he culled the business back and took a job to pay the bills, and began painting. These paintings seem to fill a deep need for primitive spiritual expression. Their source is Michael's remembrances as a child in Arkansas. He finds it very odd, but compelling to be involved in art after so many years. Michael spent much time and effort seeking what had always been right in front of him.”

SKIPPY AND HER KITS, ACRYLIC, 16 X 20, SIGNED




BACKYARD RABBITS, ACRYLIC, 16 X 20, SIGNED

Contact me at info@sundayhistorical.com with inquiries about the paintings.
Respectful comments welcome.

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Folk Artist Michael L. Cook: 14 Halloween Paintings For Sale


Sunday Historical is Proud to Present 
A series of Halloween Paintings by the 
Late Virginia Visionary Folk Artist Michael Lee Cook.
These 14 vintage acrylic on canvas paintings will be on display at vendor space SUN at Cold Harbor Antique Mall starting Saturday October 8, 2016, and are FOR SALE."Trick or Treat" is for sale now on Sunday Historical`s web store sundayhistorical.com. Look for the other 13 for sale online soon.

MICHAEL LEE COOK  1956-2014
Ruther Glen Virginia
Gallery Association: America Oh Yes at Hilton Head Island, SC and Washington, DC
Work shown at other Venues: The Inn at Glen Echo, Glen Echo, Maryland; Washington Design Center, Art on Six, Washington, DC; Folkfest, Atlanta, Georgia
The Bio below was used on the America Oh Yes Gallery website in the late 1990`s, where he had his first shows and enjoyed success as a Visionary Folk Artist.           

“Michael Cook's interest in art began more than twenty five years ago during high school. He has no formal training and previous efforts in art were restricted to pencil sketching. A few years after high school Michael's creative endeavors fell by the wayside and receded into the past, for the most part forgotten. During the intervening years he worked in a environmental/technical engineering field, including a stint as a facility manager for a public utility. In August of 1998 Michael was involved in a motorcycle accident. This became a crux for reflection and change. He walked out of a fourteen year career and started his own business. Finding some success but little satisfaction, he culled the business back and took a job to pay the bills, and began painting. These paintings seem to fill a deep need for primitive spiritual expression. Their source is Michael's remembrances as a child in Arkansas. He finds it very odd, but compelling to be involved in art after so many years. Michael spent much time and effort seeking what had always been right in front of him.”

All paintings in this series are Acrylic on Canvas. 12 are framed with plexiglass covers.
These photos don`t do justice to the colors and details of these paintings.
13 CATS acrylic on canvas 16x20, Framed


Close up of signature

TRICK OR TREAT  14x16, Framed $300

13 RACOONS 14x18, Framed $300

13 RATS 16x20, Framed  $350
13 RAZORBACKS 18x24, Framed $450

13 SQUIRRELS 14x18, Framed $300
PUMPKIN KING 16x20, Framed $350

13 BUZZARDS 16x20, Framed $350
PUMPKIN PATCH CATS 14x18, unframed $300
13 POSSUMS 14x18, Framed $300
13 GOATS 18x24, Framed $450
13 GOATS closeup
13 PUMPKINS 14x16, Framed $275

HALLOWEEN BOUQUET 12x16, unframed $225
13 CROWS 14x16, Framed $275

If you have questions or are interested in purchasing any of these fabulous Folk Art Paintings, please contact Laura at info@sundayhistorical.com. I will list what you are interested in online immediately.

Thanks for viewing the blog, respectful comments welcome.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

George C. McGhee WWII Navy Air Intelligence Officer Uniform

        WWII Navy Air Intelligence Officer Uniform ID`d to 

Ambassador George C. McGhee


George C, McGhee Navy Air Intelligence Uniform Coat & Trousers



Both custom tailored coat and trousers have custom name tag sewn in. The number A10449 is inside the coat sleeve and underside of front trouser pocket. McGhee is in faded ink on inside trouser pocket as well as other numbers. There are a few moth holes on both pieces.  Ambassador George Crews McGhee (1912-2005) was a Rhodes Scholar, oil entrepreneur, naval officer, statesman, diplomat, and philanthropist who became a central figure in postwar American diplomacy by helping to create and shape U.S. economic, military, and petroleum ties from Europe to the Far East. Over the course of his long career he served four presidents, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson, and twice served as ambassador.
At the outbreak of World War II George Crews McGhee entered the service of his country as a staff member in the Office of Production Management and on the War Production Board. He made his biggest contribution serving as a naval air intelligence officer in the Pacific on the staff of General Curtis E. LeMay. This service earned him the Legion of Merit in 1945. After the war, McGhee  joined the State Department in 1946. 8th United States Ambassador to Turkey, 4th United States Ambassador to West Germany.
Lt. Rank on sleeves




Custom Tailored Name tag sewn in both uniform pieces


WWII
"The next three months (November 1944 through January 1945) were frustrating, to say the least. Schools worked hard to train the lead crews, determined to improve bombing accuracy. Enormous efforts were made to upgrade maintenance. The depot had to start all over again, and in the meantime the air supply from Sacramento had to be improved. More missions were run against Japanese engine and aircraft factories. But the weather was a terrible opponent, and there was no intelligence of its movements. Japanese fighter opposition was desperate but not deadly, at least in comparison with German fighters. Air kamikaze-ramming tactics were tried with some success. Morale was a critical problem. The airplane engines were still unreliable. Aircraft disabled from combat or other causes were 1,500 miles from friendly territory. The crews had the choice of drowning or bailing out over Japan, to be executed by maddened Japanese. The U.S. Navy contributed tremendously to morale by stationing rescue submarines at intervals along the route. Their performance was superb. One submarine entered Tokyo Bay in daylight and picked up a B-29 crewright under the guns of the Japanese. From November 1944 to August 1945, 600 Twentieth Air Force flyers were saved in open-sea rescues. The system involved Navy flying boats, B-17s (Dumbos) carrying droppable lifeboats, B-29s (Superdumbos), and submarines, all under Navy control. The system was largely the achievement of my Navy Liaison Officer, Comdr. George C. McGhee."
Reference: The Strategic Air War Against Germany and Japan: A Memoir Haywood S. Hansell, Jr. USAF Retired


Photo from Sooner Mag Sept. 1946 article "With the Armed Forces"




Label over inside coat pocket
At the beginning of World War II McGhee was a member of the staff of the Office of Production Management and a member of the War Production Board. Commissioned into the U.S. Navy, McGhee served as a naval air intelligence officer on the staff of Army Air Force General Curtis E. LeMay, for which he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

Lt. Rank

Inside coat sleeve

A10449 written inside coat sleeve

Matching Trousers

Custom Tailored Name tag sewn in both uniform pieces

A10449 written inside both uniform pieces

Back of trousers
1943 Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Naval and Reserve

Uniform has been lost for years. McGhee`s Officer's Dress Blue Uniform and Hat are on display at Cold Harbor Antique Mall in Mechanicsville Virginia.
This piece of history is for sale at SundayHistorical.com and will help me continue my project to bring great historical items to light. My hope is that a military or other collector will buy this uniform and donate it to a museum for all to enjoy. Serious collectors please contact me at info@sundayhistorical. 

It can be purchased on my eBay Store Blueprinter1995 (Item ID: 131916891825)


10%
of the sale of this item will benefitHire Our Heroes

The mission of Hire Our Heroes (HOH) is to empower transitioning veterans with the knowledge, skills, and innovative tools necessary to secure employment after serving our country.


Great work is being done in the State of Virginia by The McGhee Foundation: The mission of The McGhee Foundation is to continue the educational and humanitarian legacy of U. S. Ambassador George C. McGhee (1912-2005) by supporting projects and programs that provide inspirational learning opportunities and enrich the lives of residents in the Virginia Piedmont area.
References: